Schedule

Submissions are currently being reviewed. Full schedule to be announced soon.

30 June
8:00 am to 9:00 am
30 June
S-block foyer

Registration Open

Registration Open
9:00 am to 9:15 am
30 June
S1.04

Welcome

Welcome: Opening by Prof Alister Jones, DVC, University of Waikato

Chair: Jo Lane

Welcome
9:10 am to 10:00 am
30 June
S1.04

The Evolution of High Performance Computing: System Design in a Data Centric World

Dave Turek – Vice President, Exascale Systems, IBM

Classic approaches to HPC are being supplanted by a new view explicitly accounting for the myriad of data issues impacting HPC workflows.

The Evolution of High Performance Computing: System Design in a Data Centric World
10:00 am to 10:30 am
30 June

Morning tea

Morning tea
10:30 am to 12:00 pm
30 June
S1.02

NZ Data Mining Workshop - Part 1

Peter Reutemann – University of Waikato
NZ Data Mining Workshop - Part 1
30 June
S1.02

Weka familiarisation

Attendants will be able to familiarize themselves with Weka, using the highly successful MOOC series "Data Mining with Weka" for self-study (experienced Data Miners will be at hand to answer questions).

Weka familiarisation
30 June
S1.04

NZ HPC Applications Workshop - Genomics

John Rugis – NeSI
Dan Sun – NeSI

The New Zealand HPC Applications Workshop is a national event to bring together everyone with an interest in applying high performance computing to the nation’s scientific challenges.

NZ HPC Applications Workshop - Genomics
30 June
S1.04

Seeing through the noise: visualizing publicly accessible cancer genomics data

Mik Black – University of Otago; Virtual Institute of Statistical Genetics

In the field of cancer research, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) projects provide researchers with access to genomic, proteomic, clinical and treatment data from many thousands of individuals.

Seeing through the noise: visualizing publicly accessible cancer genomics data
30 June
S1.04

Genome-wide Copy Number Variation (CNV) detection in Malus x domestica

James Boocock – University of Otago; Virtual Institute of Statistical Genetics
David Chagné – Plant and Food Research
Mik Black – University of Otago; Virtual Institute of Statistical Genetics
Tony Merriman – University of Otago; Virtual Institute of Statistical Genetics

Genetic variation takes many forms from large chromosomal anomalies to individual base pair changes. Copy number variants (CNVs) are considered to be gains or losses of DNA segments larger than 1 kb.

Genome-wide Copy Number Variation (CNV) detection in Malus x domestica
30 June
S1.04

A bioinformatics workflow for detecting signatures of selection in genomic data

Murray Cadzow – University of Otago; Virtual Institute of Statistical Genetics
James Boocock – University of Otago; Virtual Institute of Statistical Genetics
Hoang Tan Nguyen – University of Otago; Virtual Institute of Statistical Genetics
Philip Wilcox – Scion; Virtual Institute of Statistical Genetics
Tony Merriman – University of Otago; Virtual Institute of Statistical Genetics
Mik Black – University of Otago; Virtual Institute of Statistical Genetics

The detection of “signatures of selection” is now possible on a genome-wide scale in many plant and animals species, and can be performed in a population-specific manner, due to the wealth of per-population genome-wide genotype data that is available.

A bioinformatics workflow for detecting signatures of selection in genomic data
30 June
S1.04

Bioinformatic analysis of synthetic lethal genetic interactions in breast cancer

Thomas Kelly – University of Otago

Synthetic lethal (SL) interactions, the reduced viability of a double mutant from the respective single mutants, can help to identify candidate genes for the development of targeted cancer therapies.

Bioinformatic analysis of synthetic lethal genetic interactions in breast cancer
30 June
S1.04

Enabling very complex experiments: Genomics for production & security in a biological economy

Rob Elshire – AgResearch

Genotyping By Sequencing (GBS) is a new technology being used by a large New Zealand collaboration of Universities and Research Institutes to exploit DNA based information for the benefit of New Zealand’s biological economy.

Enabling very complex experiments: Genomics for production & security in a biological economy
30 June
S1.04

Open Discussion

Open Discussion
12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
30 June

Lunch

Lunch
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
30 June
S1.02

NZ Data Mining Workshop - Part 2

Peter Reutemann – University of Waikato
NZ Data Mining Workshop - Part 2
30 June
S1.02

WEKA in the ecosystem for scientific computing

This session will demonstrate how to access the WEKA data mining software from Octave/Matlab, R, and Python, and will also consider how some R functionality can be applied from within WEKA.

WEKA in the ecosystem for scientific computing
30 June
S1.04

NZ HPC Applications Workshop - Computational Biology and Physics

John Rugis – NeSI
Dan Sun – NeSI
NZ HPC Applications Workshop - Computational Biology and Physics
30 June
S1.04

Towards a Parallelised Fitting Infrastructure for Computational Molecular Cardiovascular Research

Mike Cooling – Auckland Bioengineering Institute

Building computational models is one approach to pursuing complex medical questions. In order to be realistic, such models need to be constrained to experimental data.

Towards a Parallelised Fitting Infrastructure for Computational Molecular Cardiovascular Research
30 June
S1.04

The Murchison Widefield Array – an example of NZ data science

Melanie Johnston-Hollitt – Victoria University of Wellington
Kevin Buckley – Victoria University of Wellington
Luke Hindson – Victoria University of Wellington

The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new 65 million dollar low frequency radio telescope operating in remote Western Australia.

The Murchison Widefield Array – an example of NZ data science
30 June
S1.04

Environmental Modelling at both large and small scales: How simulating complexity leads to a range of computing challenges

Bryan Lawrence – University of Reading: Professor of Weather and Climate Computing. National Centre for Atmospheric Science: Director of Models and Data. STFC: Director of the Centre for Environmental Data Archival.

Global earth system models simulate a range of processes from atmospheres and oceans, to clouds and carbon cycling, but while such models are (arguably) well suited for projecting long-term global futures, they aren't yet much use for making long-term predictions at regional and local scales.

Environmental Modelling at both large and small scales: How simulating complexity leads to a range of computing challenges
30 June
S1.04

Studying allosteric enzyme inhibition using simulated molecular dynamics

Ben Roberts – NeSI
Eric Lang – University of Canterbury
Emily Parker – University of Canterbury

Allosteric control of enzyme activity is a key component of metabolic pathway regulation.

Studying allosteric enzyme inhibition using simulated molecular dynamics
30 June
S1.04

The stereodynamics of association of liquid crystal forming molecules

Andrew Rohl – Curtin University
Damien Carter – Curtin University
Bart Kahr – NYU
Paolo Raiteri – Curtin University

Lyotropic liquid crystals are compounds where the transitions between the liquid crystal phases are controlled by both temperature and concentration. They are usually composed of long-chain amphiphiles that form micelles.

The stereodynamics of association of liquid crystal forming molecules
30 June
S1.04

Multiscale modelling of saliva secretion

John Rugis – NeSI
James Sneyd – University of Auckland

This bioengineering project encompasses a range of activities including anatomical data based structural modeling, solution of calcium dynamics and fluid transport equations, full 3-D simulation, interactive visualisation and validation of results by comparison to experimental data.

Multiscale modelling of saliva secretion
30 June
S1.04

Numerical experiments with the N-body code GENGA

Philip Sharp – University of Auckland

Mercury (Chambers 1999) is widely used Fortran 77 package for performing N-Body simulations of Solar System dynamics. The package assumes the underlying model for the dynamics has a central body, some massive bodies, and a large number of small bodies.

Numerical experiments with the N-body code GENGA
3:00 pm to 3:15 pm
30 June

Afternoon Tea

Afternoon Tea
3:15 pm to 5:30 pm
30 June
S1.02

NZ Data Mining Workshop - Part 3

Peter Reutemann – University of Waikato
NZ Data Mining Workshop - Part 3
30 June
S1.02

Scientific workflow management with ADAMS

Workflow systems allow researchers to define and document complex data processing tasks and experiments using a graphical approach. In this session, ADAMS will be used for data mining, data processing and data visualization tasks.

Scientific workflow management with ADAMS
30 June
S1.04

NZ HPC Applications Workshop - Methods and Infrastructure

John Rugis – NeSI
Dan Sun – NeSI
NZ HPC Applications Workshop - Methods and Infrastructure
30 June
S1.04

A faster parallel algorithm for matrix multiplication on a mesh array

Sung Bae – NeSI

Matrix multiplication is a fundamental mathematical operation that has numerous applications across most scientific fields.

A faster parallel algorithm for matrix multiplication on a mesh array
30 June
S1.04

Enabling high throughput research on HPC systems

François Bissey – NeSI

Many HPC clusters (at BlueFern and NIWA for example) are geared towards jobs using several cores or even nodes at once. But there is another class of jobs were the problem is embarrassingly parallel. In such case you will want to run a task using a single core multiple times.

Enabling high throughput research on HPC systems
30 June
S1.04

Desktop integration with supercomputers

Martin Feller – University of Auckland

Some researchers run complex computational workflows on their computers. Individual tasks of these workflows can be compute-intensive, and some workflows involve launching a whole batch of computations, e.g. a parameter sweep, which can easily overload a single computer.

Desktop integration with supercomputers
30 June
S1.04

Science domains in NeSI cluster job submissions - first results

Gene Soudlenkov – NeSI

One of the machines, governed and supported by NeSI, is the University of Auckland-based cluster Pan. The cluster has over 400 registered users, serves over 300 projects and receives hundreds of thousands of job requests per month.

Science domains in NeSI cluster job submissions - first results
30 June
S1.04

Open Discussion

Open Discussion
5:30 pm to 7:30 pm
30 June

Playhouse Foyer, Gallagher Academy of Performing Arts, the University of Waikato.

Welcome Reception

An informal gathering, open to all conference delegates in the foyer of the Academy of

Welcome Reception
1 July
8:00 am to 9:00 am
1 July
S-block foyer

Registration Open

Registration Open
9:00 am to 9:45 am
1 July
S1.04

The road to exascale for climate science: crossing borders or crossing disciplines, can one do both at the same time?

Bryan Lawrence – University of Reading: Professor of Weather and Climate Computing. National Centre for Atmospheric Science: Director of Models and Data. STFC: Director of the Centre for Environmental Data Archival.

The grand challenges of climate science have significant infrastructural implications, which lead to requirements for integrated e-infrastructure - integrated at national and international scales, but serving users from a variety of disciplines.

The road to exascale for climate science: crossing borders or crossing disciplines, can one do both at the same time?
9:50 am to 10:05 am
1 July
S1.04

eResearch and HPC training opportunities in New Zealand – an overview and future vision

Stuart Charters – Lincoln University

There is a need for researchers in New Zealand to get appropriate training to take best advantage of high performance computing (HPC) systems and technologies to improve their research outputs.

eResearch and HPC training opportunities in New Zealand – an overview and future vision
10:05 am to 10:20 am
1 July
S1.04

What a mission! New skills and services that support humanities research

Charlotte Brown – University of Otago
Vanessa Gibbs – University of Otago

Humanities research processes are converting from analogue-to-digital. To better understand, support, and enable research in an online environment, librarians need to adapt and engage more closely with academics at all stages of the research process.

What a mission! New skills and services that support humanities research
10:20 am to 10:45 am
1 July

Morning Tea

Sponsored by DataDirect Networks

Morning Tea
10:45 am to 11:00 am
1 July
S1.04

REANNZ: Scaling up to meet the needs of eResearch

Steve Cotter – REANNZ
REANNZ: Scaling up to meet the needs of eResearch
11:00 am to 11:15 am
1 July
S1.04

Envision, Collaborate, and innovate with access federation

Sat Mandri – Tuakiri NZ Access Federation; NeSI
Heath Marks – Australian Access Federation

Access federation is now an established national service in New Zealand, Australia, and further abroad. Currently there are 37 national federations around the world. The Australian Access Federation Inc.

Envision, Collaborate, and innovate with access federation
11:15 am to 11:30 am
1 July
S1.04

NeSI: Advanced computation and analysis for New Zealand researchers

Nick Jones – NeSI
NeSI: Advanced computation and analysis for New Zealand researchers
11:30 am to 11:45 am
1 July
S1.04

NZGL's Bioinformatics and Bio-IT services: Computer-assisted analysis and data storage for New Zealand scientists

Tony Lough – NZ Genomics

NZGL’s shared genomics and bioinformatics support provide cost-effective access (through government subsidies) to a secure and scalable computing infrastructure – one that is supported by a range of software and databases, and a team of New Zealand-based bioinformaticians.

NZGL's Bioinformatics and Bio-IT services: Computer-assisted analysis and data storage for New Zealand scientists
11:45 am to 12:15 pm
1 July
S1.04

e-Infrastructures Panel: Growing and developing e-infrastructures in NZ

e-Infrastructures Panel: Growing and developing e-infrastructures in NZ
12:15 pm to 1:15 pm
1 July

Lunch

Lunch
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
1 July
S1.04

A View of the Research Cloud as seen by a Plane Flying Overhead

David Flanders – ANDS
A View of the Research Cloud as seen by a Plane Flying Overhead
1 July
S1.04

Our national eResearch cloud

Bruno Lago – Catalyst

Can New Zealand develop its own federated eResearch cloud? Is it possible to enable Crown Research Institutes and Universities to obtain the IT resources they need for their research quickly and with minimal friction?

Our national eResearch cloud
1 July
S1.04

Science defined networking

Sam Russell – REANNZ

The phrase "Software Defined Networking" is thrown around as a buzzword by people who claim to be designing the next generation of computer networks. What does this mean for you?

Science defined networking
1 July
S1.04

Pentaho PDI – a Swiss Army chainsaw for data

Piers Harding – Catalyst

Pentaho Business Intelligence Suite has long been the leading Open Source BI reporting solution, but what is less well known is the versatility of the ETL (Extraction Transformation and Loading) component, Pentaho PDI.

Pentaho PDI – a Swiss Army chainsaw for data
1 July
S1.02

Scalable Distributed Storage with CEPH

Ricardo Rocha – Catalyst
Scalable Distributed Storage with CEPH
1 July
S1.04

Using "unsafe" delegated authorisation to manage access to sensitive data

David Eyers – University of Otago

Many of the eResearch tools currently available for managing the data of research projects that are designed to operate within National Research/Educational Network (NREN) infrastructure, fall short in their capacity to support delegated authorisation processes that are appropriate for the needs

Using "unsafe" delegated authorisation to manage access to sensitive data
1 July
S1.04

Stay Tuned

Jordi Blasco – NeSI

There was a time when all the people used to take care about the performance, the scalability and the efficiency.

Stay Tuned
1 July
S1.04

Doing BigData better with Hadoop ImpalaDB and R

Piers Harding – Catalyst

New and faster ways of accessing your Hadoop data warehouse from R

Doing BigData better with Hadoop ImpalaDB and R
1 July
S1.02

NZ Research Data Workshop: Practice and Implementation

Alison Stringer – Ministry for the Environment
Fabiana Kubke – University of Auckland
NZ Research Data Workshop: Practice and Implementation
1 July
S1.02

Data integration in Canterbury: Lessons learned from the CEISMIC Archive

James Smithies – University of Canterbury

The UC CEISMIC Digital Archive was established in 2011 to identify, archive, and make publically accessible digital content related to the events that occurred following the earthquakes of September 2010 and February 2011.

Data integration in Canterbury: Lessons learned from the CEISMIC Archive
1 July
S1.02

An Advanced Digital Environment supporting Spinal Cord Injury in Australasia

Anthony Stell – University of Melbourne

The SpinalCare (SCI) online environment offers a secure, central repository capturing a range of information about SCI around Australasia.

An Advanced Digital Environment supporting Spinal Cord Injury in Australasia
1 July
S1.02

An Australasian-wide Registry of Juvenile Diabetes Patients in the Cloud

Loren Bruns – University of Melbourne

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) is a cloud-based registry of diabetes-related phenotypical data captured from juvenile diabetes clinics across Australia and New Zealand.

An Australasian-wide Registry of Juvenile Diabetes Patients in the Cloud
1 July
S1.02

The National Environmental Monitoring Standards Initiative

Alison Stringer – Ministry for the Environment
The National Environmental Monitoring Standards Initiative
1 July
S1.02

LERNZdb Freshwater Database

Aroon Parshotam – University of Waikato
Kevin Collier – University of Waikato
Stefan Mutter – University of Waikato
David Hamilton – University of Waikato
Andrea Schweer – University of Waikato
Grant Tempero – University of Waikato
Richard Lamont – University of Waikato
Chris McBride – University of Waikato

We present an overview of LERNZdb (Lake Ecosystem Restoration New Zealand Freshwater Database)1, a data repository supporting the storage and retrieval of water quality and biodiversity measurement data for lakes, rivers and wetlands in New Zealand.

LERNZdb Freshwater Database
1 July
S1.02

Developing an Analytics Infrastructure at the Ministry of Social Development

Michael O’Neil – Ministry of Social Development

This presentation will provide a high level overview of a “technical refresh” of the MSD Data Warehouse technology platform and associated development of an Integrated Client Architecture to support analytics applied in the social sector to improve outcomes for New Zealanders.

Developing an Analytics Infrastructure at the Ministry of Social Development
1 July
S1.02

Integrated Data Infrastructure - cross-government collaboration to achieve data-driven decision making

Jessica Young – Stats NZ

Statistics New Zealand’s Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI) is changing the landscape when it comes to providing data for evidence-based policy evaluation and research.

Integrated Data Infrastructure - cross-government collaboration to achieve data-driven decision making
1 July
S1.02

Supporting data preservation. A vision for New Zealand

Peter McKinney – National Library of New Zealand

This paper will describe the work undertaken to date by the National and State Libraries of Australasia (NSLA) in developing a technical registry to support digital preservation activities.

Supporting data preservation. A vision for New Zealand
3:00 pm to 3:15 pm
1 July
S-block foyer

Afternoon Tea

Afternoon Tea
3:15 pm to 5:15 pm
1 July
S1.04

HPC Accelerators Workshop

Sina Masoud-Ansari – University of Auckland
John Rugis – NeSI
Jordi Blasco – NeSI

Accelerators are used in four of the Top 10 Supercomputers worldwide (including the top 2) and in all of the Top 10 Green Supercomputers (November 2013). Accelerators can be accessed via enabled applications, special versions of libraries as well as custom code.

HPC Accelerators Workshop
1 July
S1.04

NVIDIA CUDA Enabled Applications and Latest Developments

Sina Masoud-Ansari – University of Auckland
NVIDIA CUDA Enabled Applications and Latest Developments
1 July
S1.04

Open Discussion

Open Discussion
1 July
S1.04

NVIDIA CUDA Architecture and Programming Model

John Rugis – NeSI
NVIDIA CUDA Architecture and Programming Model
1 July
S1.04

Open Discussion

Open Discussion
1 July
S1.04

Intel Phi: Architecture and Programming Model

Jordi Blasco – NeSI
Intel Phi: Architecture and Programming Model
1 July
S1.04

Open Discussion

Open Discussion
1 July
S1.02

NZ Research Data Workshop: Policy and Motivation

Alison Stringer – Ministry for the Environment
Fabiana Kubke – University of Auckland
NZ Research Data Workshop: Policy and Motivation
1 July
S1.02

Discussion

Discussion
5:15 pm to 5:45 pm
1 July
S1.04

Day 2 Wrap Up

Jo Lane – University of Waikato
Day 2 Wrap Up
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
1 July

Narrows Landing
431 Airport Road
RD 2, Tamahere

Conference Dinner

One ticket to the conference dinner is included in the full symposium registration.

Conference Dinner
2 July
9:00 am to 9:45 am
2 July
S1.04

Making the web work for science

Kaitlin Thaney – Director, Mozilla Science Lab

Modern day research could use a hard refresh. In recent years, we've seen an explosion of activity and push for more "open science",  from increased access to content and data to new tools and technology to help us address bottlenecks slowing down discovery.

Making the web work for science
9:50 am to 10:05 am
2 July
S1.04

GigaScience – improving data sharing, integration and reproducibility

Nicole Nogoy – GigaScience

We are now in the era of data driven science, with excitement of the potential benefits coupled with fears of a data deluge.

GigaScience – improving data sharing, integration and reproducibility
10:05 am to 10:20 am
2 July
S1.04

Recent telematics electroacoustic music: Integrating external data streams

Ian Whalley – University of Waikato

Over the last five years I have explored telematic electroacoustic music composition and performance using high-speed Internet2 as a creative distributed sonic space.

Recent telematics electroacoustic music: Integrating external data streams
10:20 am to 10:45 am
2 July

Morning Tea

Morning Tea
10:45 am to 12:00 pm
2 July
S1.04

JASMIN: the Joint Analysis System for big data

Bryan Lawrence – University of Reading: Professor of Weather and Climate Computing. National Centre for Atmospheric Science: Director of Models and Data. STFC: Director of the Centre for Environmental Data Archival.

JASMIN is designed to deliver a shared data infrastructure for the UK environmental science community.  We describe the hybrid batch/cloud environment and some of the compromises we have made to provide a curated archive inside and alongside various levels of managed and unmanaged cloud ...

JASMIN: the Joint Analysis System for big data
2 July
S1.04

Selection and Trialling of a Software Framework for Interoperable Freshwater Modelling

Sandy Elliot – NIWA
Gabriella Turek – NIWA
Valerie Snow – AgResearch
Daniel Rutledge – Landcare Research
Alistair Ritchie – Landcare Research
Alexander Herzig – Landcare Research

Recent cross-party initiatives in freshwater management in New Zealand have called for increased use of integrated and interoperable freshwater models to support community-based freshwater management.

Selection and Trialling of a Software Framework for Interoperable Freshwater Modelling
2 July
S1.04

Communicating and managing the 'messy knowledge' of biology wet lab experiments

Cameron McLean – University of Auckland

Organising our knowledge of laboratory experiments in ways that can be interpreted and shared by both human and machine is desirable for leveraging computational tools to assist the discovery, reuse, integration, and reasoning over our scientific knowledge.

Communicating and managing the 'messy knowledge' of biology wet lab experiments
2 July
S1.04

As We May Link: A Model to Support Aggregated Scientific Knowledge

Prashant Gupta – University of Auckland

Today, researchers are bogged down by continually growing amount of complex and diverse scientific knowledge, fragmented and dispersed among various disciplines, communities and information resources.

As We May Link: A Model to Support Aggregated Scientific Knowledge
2 July
S1.04

NeCTAR virtual laboratories – the research drivers for cloud

Glenn Moloney – NeCTAR
Nigel Ward – NeCTAR
NeCTAR virtual laboratories – the research drivers for cloud
12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
2 July

Lunch

Lunch
1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
2 July
S1.04

eResearch for the non-eResearcher

Fabiana Kubke – University of Auckland

After touring New Zealand following the eResearch conference I reflect on the things I learned along the way and how the eResearch community helped me change my practice. As it turns out, eResearch is not just for the eResearcher.

eResearch for the non-eResearcher
2 July
S1.04

eResearch at VUW: The eScience Consultant's Tale

Kevin Buckley – Victoria University of Wellington

In 2008, Victoria University of Wellington finally filled the post of eScience Consultant, although back then the post had been drawn up with the title of eResearch Programmer, not that either name really gives much insight into the range of facilitation that the role has provided.

eResearch at VUW: The eScience Consultant's Tale
2 July
S1.04

Speeding up science by harnessing the power of peer review

Andrew Preston – Publons

Publons is an academic startup based in Wellington, NZ.

Our mission is to speed up the way science is done in the real world by harnessing the power of peer review.

Speeding up science by harnessing the power of peer review
2 July
S1.04

The challenges of using YouTube as a data resource

Craig Hight – University of Waikato

This presentation outlines some of the difficulties in selecting, collating and analysing a variety of forms of material from YouTube to answer humanities-based research questions.

The challenges of using YouTube as a data resource
2 July
S1.04

Data visualisation to communicate research

Harkanwal Singh – NZ Herald

Data visualisation is become increasingly prevalent within news media as a way of communicating research containing large data sets. In New Zealand media, the uptake of such methods has been slow in comparison to overseas.

Data visualisation to communicate research
2:00 pm to 3:45 pm
2 July
S1.04

eResearch 2020 Panel: What will researchers need from eResearch by 2020?

eResearch 2020 Panel: What will researchers need from eResearch by 2020?

Sponsors